A walk about Fort Gibson–Setting of The Officer Series

Let me preface this by saying, these are (almost) all exterior pictures. I went down to Fort Gibson to take pictures last spring and took a TON of the rooms and whatnot. This time when I went (last Tuesday), I got there only to learn they were getting ready for some renovations and practically none of the rooms were set up with furnitures so they could begin on repairs. So either A. I’ll have to drag my husband back there again OR B. I’ll have to find my old pictures.

But, without being able to take pictures of some of the rooms of the fort, I was able to get some of the exterior.

Commanding Officers’ cabins (such as Colonel Lewis and General Ridgely). That is actually two residences, a home on each side.

 

Commissary–the building referenced when Allison jumps out of the stage coach. This is now a museum.

Bakery

 

The following four are from inside the bakery.

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This is standing in front of the officer's lounge and looking down. What all the doors on the left would be are offices for the officers and a little further down would be where the unmarried officers would bunk--four to a room and two to a bed.

This is standing in front of the officer’s lounge and looking down. What all the doors on the left would be are offices for the officers and a little further down would be where the unmarried officers would bunk–four to a room and two to a bed.

 

Side view of the watch tower/blockhouse.

Side view of the watch tower/blockhouse.

 

Exterior shot of the officer’s dining hall.

Interior shot of the officer’s dining hall. There were some chairs, but mostly benches all set up doing down the row.

An alley between two sections of the fort. There are these little walkways in all four “sides” of the square and by each blockhouse/watch tower.

 

The stocks.

Things found inside the jail:

Use your imagination…

Ball and chain

It was actually very common for men who were published at the fort to have to wear a sign around their neck proclaiming their crime.

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The men’s rations–lye soap, beans, bread, sugar, salt, vinegar, bag.

 

And if you’ve been wondering what a shako looks like….

Commissioned and Commanding Officers hats.

This wasn’t from the exact period, as in the 1840s the feather on the top was actually red!

I hope you enjoyed these and

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24 comments on “A walk about Fort Gibson–Setting of The Officer Series

  1. jeannemiro says:

    Hi Rose!

    I have to admit that even though I know quite a bit about the American Revolution I’m a little lacking about Fort Gibson in the 1800′s! In fact I had to check in my old encylopedia set to find out more about it and what was going on in Oklahoma back then!

    I was amazed to find out that it was the fort that lay farther west than any other military post in the United States at the time and was one of the chain of forts that north–south chain of forts intended to maintain peace on the frontier of the American West and to protect the southwestern border of the Louisiana Purchase.

    Sometimes we forget how far west the Civil War impacted other parts of the country than the one we each live in!

    Thanks for sharing your great pictures!

    • Rose Gordon says:

      LOL No worries, Jeanne. Oklahoma is a somewhat forgotten (and possibly neglected) part of the country when it comes to history. It was fun to bring it to life though.

  2. darah says:

    Wow, that was fun! I always enjoy being able to “see” where a story takes place. You’ll be happy to know that your great descriptions in the book were well done. The image I had in my head as I read matches these pictures pretty closely.

  3. Heather says:

    Very cool! Thanks for sharing. You did a great job with the description in the books.

  4. Lisa says:

    Thanks for taking us on the mini vacation! You created the settings so well it was just like the actual thing. I love going to historical places for vacations. We recently went to visit “The Hermitage” and it was so interesting to “feel” the history and the story as you walked around.

  5. Crystal says:

    What a fun look into what it was like. Great pictures!

  6. Heather says:

    Thanks for taking us on a little history tour! I can now picture the places you described in the book. Love the pictures!!

  7. Tami says:

    That was fun!! I love historical sites!

  8. Suzan says:

    I truly have enjoyed all of your books. I love your writing style and story lines. You have a wonderful way of describing people and places. And the descriptions of the fort in your book ‘The Officer and the Bostoner’ very much match your pictures. I visited this fort with my family back in 1977 when I was 12 years old. Needless to say it brought back very fond memories. Thanks for sharing.

    • Rose Gordon says:

      Thanks for the wonderful comment, Susan. I’m thrilled you’ve enjoyed my stories!

      What a small world that you’ve visited there, too. I have to admit, it’s not a major tourist attraction by any stretch of the imagination, so it’s kind of neat to think I’m not the only one who’s been!

      Thanks for reading and commenting!

  9. Karen Miller says:

    Very cool. I always love going to those historical places like that to get a feel of how they lived back then.

    • Rose Gordon says:

      I always find it a bit sad, amazing, and humbling all at the same time when I visit places like this and think how simple and rustic their lives were compared to mine. I also get a bit sad thinking everyone who was there “originally” is no longer alive to claim the house, room or whatever they once used and loved.

  10. Judy DV says:

    Thanks, Rose. I love visuals. Didn’t see some poor married guy attached to the “old ball and chain” there though :-)

    • Rose Gordon says:

      LOL My husband wouldn’t put it on… He said he was already wearing it…

      I have no idea if they really used balls and chains there or if it was just someone’s interpretation of what might have been there, but I do imagine the bucket was pretty realistic.

  11. So that is what the alley looks like. I had the hardest time picturing that for some reason.

    Those were fun to see. It makes history come alive when you visit these places, doesn’t it?

    LOL on the ball and chain. My first thought was what Judy said. :D

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